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FDA’s new e-cigarette regulations target ‘healthier than tobacco’ claims


The first federal regulations for electronic cigarettes will be announced this Thursday, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The proposals will include a ban on sales to minors, as well as requiring approval from the FDA, as well as health…

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IBM’s Watson supercomputer will soon be your personal shopper


Watson had been a doctor, a geneticist, a game show contestant and even a chef in the past. But now IBM’s supercomputer has a new career: personal shopping. IBM has partnered with digital commerce firm Fluid to develop a cloud-based app called Expert…

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Researchers study the impact that “unfriending” someone has


A couple of studies from the University of Colorado Denver has revealed new insight into the most common kind of ‘friend’ who is unfriended on one of the most popular social networks around, Facebook, as well as the unfriended person’s emotional response to such a situation. The possibility is extremely high that the unfriended person is no more than a high school acquaintance. Do you find the result of this study to be true in your experience?

Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend’ to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it. The studies, published earlier this year, show that the most likely person to be unfriended is a high school acquaintance. ”The most common reason for unfriending someone from high school is that the person posted polarizing comments often about religion or politics,” said Christopher Sibona, a doctoral student in the Computer Science and Information Systems program at the CU Denver Business School. “The other big reason for unfriending was frequent, uninteresting posts.” Sibona’s first study examined `context collapse and unfriending behaviors’ on Facebook and his second looked at `the  to being unfriended.’

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AOL bringing Miramax movies to its online video platform


AOL doesn’t just want short clips of newsy content on its online video platform, AOL On. That’s why the company (which, disclosure, owns Engadget) has signed a non-exclusive deal with Miramax to screen some of its movies on the service. The first…

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AOL bringing Miramax movies to its online video platform


AOL doesn’t just want short clips of newsy content on its online video platform, AOL On. That’s why the company (which, disclosure, owns Engadget) has signed a non-exclusive deal with Miramax to screen some of its movies on the service. The first…

No responses yet

AOL bringing Miramax movies to its online video platform


AOL doesn’t just want short clips of newsy content on its online video platform, AOL On. That’s why the company (which, disclosure, owns Engadget) has signed a non-exclusive deal with Miramax to screen some of its movies on the service. The first…

No responses yet

AOL bringing Miramax movies to its online video platform


AOL doesn’t just want short clips of newsy content on its online video platform, AOL On. That’s why the company (which, disclosure, owns Engadget) has signed a non-exclusive deal with Miramax to screen some of its movies on the service. The first…

No responses yet

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