Top
Viagra

DARPA envisions a smarter, safer autopilot


Autonomous aircraft serve their purpose, but there’s no question that pilotless passenger flights are a long way off, if they ever become a reality. Still, there’s obviously room for improvement when it comes to on-board systems that assist pilots in…

No responses yet

Tubecore wants you to hack and mod its beautiful, modular speaker


Let’s be honest: Wireless speakers are a dime a dozen. The options are seemingly endless, and new ones arrive on an almost daily basis. Companies have begun to push the boundaries of design as of late, making options that are an aesthetic step above…

No responses yet

Cyborg glasses can express your emotions for you


Emotional labor is a kind of work we often don’t recognize as work: the need to appear friendly, deferential, or attentive at a job. Fast food restaurant Pret a Manger is famous for holding its employees to exacting friendliness standards, and emotional labor’s overall importance is becoming a more and more pressing question. It’s frequently, for example, implicated when talking about the supposed American “crisis of masculinity” and the growth of the service sector.

As Google continues to stoke excitement for its Glass smart-eyewear, a Japanese researcher has developed a radical alternative. Rather than focus on what the owner sees, Prof Hirotaka Osawa’s kit shows computer-generated eye animations in place of the wearer’s real ones. Special lenses let the user see out or take a secret nap if they prefer. The professor said the glasses could be used to simulate emotional reactions when users are distracted or busy. He added that the idea of creating an “emotional cyborg” was inspired by the work of an American sociologist who had coined the phrase “emotional labour” to refer to the use of facial expressions and body movements to show feelings. This, Prof Osawa noted, could be a requirement for nurses, waitresses, teachers, therapists and others working in interaction-intensive professions. ”Our developed society requires workers to behave more socially,” he told the BBC.

No responses yet

Optical zoom tipped to hit HTC handsets in 2015


Like most companies in the smartphone game, HTC wants to pack its top-of-the-range devices with powerful camera tech, and that’s no longer just a case of adding more megapixels. The new HTC One (M8), for instance, hosts a pair of Ultrapixel cameras…

No responses yet

‘Wearable eyes’ take all the work out of having emotions


Ever seen one of those funny novelty spectacles with eyes drawn on them? Dr. Hirotaka Osawa from Tsukuba University in Japan has designed a high-tech version of those called AgencyGlass, and they have eyes that actually move. The digital eyes blink…

No responses yet

AOL hated AIM despite its popularity


Before Facebook and MySpace, before you were connecting with friends and family with WhatsApp, there was AIM, probably one of the most recognizable names from the early Internet. If you were a child of the 90s, chances are you used the famous chat program, which was offered as a free service by AOL. It was ahead of its time, and laid the groundwork for many of the services people use today—both social networks and chat platforms. But whatever happened to AIM, and why isn’t it more popular today? Money.

The 1990s belonged to America Online. It had risen above competitors in Prodigy and CompuServe to become the dominant Internet service provider for American households. Millions of subscribers paid AOL monthly for the ability to sign online. Its disks could be found almost anywhere. The “You’ve got mail” notification became the sound Americans associated with their first email accounts, as well as a movie with Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. Barry Appelman, Eric Bosco and Jerry Harris worked at AOL in the 1990s and early 2000s as engineers on AOL Instant Messenger, known commonly as AIM.

No responses yet

AOL hated AIM despite its popularity


Before Facebook and MySpace, before you were connecting with friends and family with WhatsApp, there was AIM, probably one of the most recognizable names from the early Internet. If you were a child of the 90s, chances are you used the famous chat program, which was offered as a free service by AOL. It was ahead of its time, and laid the groundwork for many of the services people use today—both social networks and chat platforms. But whatever happened to AIM, and why isn’t it more popular today? Money.

The 1990s belonged to America Online. It had risen above competitors in Prodigy and CompuServe to become the dominant Internet service provider for American households. Millions of subscribers paid AOL monthly for the ability to sign online. Its disks could be found almost anywhere. The “You’ve got mail” notification became the sound Americans associated with their first email accounts, as well as a movie with Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. Barry Appelman, Eric Bosco and Jerry Harris worked at AOL in the 1990s and early 2000s as engineers on AOL Instant Messenger, known commonly as AIM.

No responses yet

Next »

Bottom