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3 reasons why Sony’s SD backup should go worldwide

July 21, 2013

Sony SD Backup

About a week ago, Sony announced its plans to release a line of SD cards – as well as other pieces of software – for the sake of backing up laptop computers. Consumers would, in essence, be able to take their files with them. Through an AES 256-bit encryption process and the use of a single password, all files would be set on that card and remain secure.

The only caveat is that Sony only plans to release these cards in Japan.

Starting on August 20th, cards in three size amounts – 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB – will hit stores in Japan will only work with devices possessing Windows to start. I don’t think that it takes a Sony tech support member to tell you just how great these could be. Judging from what I’ve read, not only do you have a choice of storage space but your files are going to be protected as well as portable. That being said, I feel like they should go worldwide and here are three reasons why.

 

1. The prevalence of laptops.

It’s clear that your general PCs are not going to go away, especially when you take into account just how many people game on them as a passion. When it comes to school or office use, though, you’d be hard-pressed not to find laptops. These cards are meant for such computers, which typically have more minimal space. When making the commute to work, the idea of an SD card with all of your applications and files on it has potential.

 

2. Try before you buy is tried and true.

Sony said that it would be utilizing “Real-Time Backup Utility” software, which would be seen along with these cards. However, the company would be allowing trial downloads of said software in Japan, so who is to say that it shouldn’t reach other areas of the world that can use it? When you’re talking about any applications, be it games or what have you, demos diminish hesitance in buyers. The freedom of using other companies’ cards for said demo can help, too.

 

3. Sony can keep the hype train rolling.

Even if it’s too early to make a prediction, the PlayStation 4 has made me confident that it would be the most successful video game console of the next generation. Sony is sitting nicely on a saddle of hype and they don’t want to fall off of the horse of reputation management. Wouldn’t the idea of bringing this kind of storage to other lands help them along? If these cards prove to be successful in Japan, then I can imagine they would reach just as much success, if not more, in the United States.

One other concern that might be had, if the cards ever reach the United States, is price. Keep in mind that, in American dollars, the 64GB card would cost around $140, which many would consider outrageous for such a small device. Even so, I can see why people would want to keep their physical storage limited while still having enough digital storage to keep the essentials together. Price may not be much of a deterrent.

Do you think Sony should bring these backup SD cards for laptops worldwide? Leave your thoughts below!

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